Review: RFK, a production by Theater, Interrupted

Face to Face Films took its cue from the global pandemic in 2020, offering fans of the theater an opportunity to see and experience quality productions from the cozy confines of home. While props and music and staging has evolved since the initial production, the talent and direction has remained top notch.

For its latest production, Theater, Interrupted staged the one-man performance of RFK, written by Jack Holmes.

To begin the production, Face to Face company singer Madison C. Gray welcomed the audience with beautiful acapella renditions of Song of Silence and American Pie, setting the stage for the emotional journey of Robert Kennedy with a haunting sweetness.

Staged at the desk of RFK, the fiery politician framed by an American flag and portrait of sailboats, director Anthony M. Laura gives an online audience the presentable look of a staged performance. Accompanied with music by Philip Lauto, the experience of streaming theater is no longer a novelty, but rather a pleasant and welcomed new normal. With RFK, Theater, Interrupted has once more shown that theater can be an experience to behold, no matter where or when it is viewed.

RFK begins in 1964 and covers the span of 4 years, as Robert Kennedy copes with the loss of his brother, struggles with his political future, the enemies he made as Attorney General, his place in the family, and finds a voice during a time of civil unrest and war.

Dan Kelly portrays Robert Kennedy with an engaging mix of passion and uncertainty, channeling the insecurities and frustrations of a charismatic politician who could never live up to the towering shadow cast by his brother, John F. Kennedy. Kelly brings charm and flair, capturing the heart and charisma—and Boston accent—embodied by RFK.

From the opening scene nine months after his brother’s assassination, to his appearance in the 1968 primaries that brought an end to his life, the journey of RFK is well told, conceived beautifully, and a performance to be remembered.

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