Review: Steel Magnolias, a Theater, Interrupted Production

I won’t lie. I love Steel Magnolias. It’s a sweet southern story full of humor, emotional swings, and strong women that are impossible to forget. The film, which hit theaters to great fanfare in 1989, was cast to perfection (Shirley MacLaine as Ouiser and Dolly Parton as Truvy in particular have always stuck with me in their roles). However, most who know the film may not be aware that it was based on a play, written by Robert Harling, which premiered in 1987.

There are notable differences in the storytelling structure from stage to screen, as one might expect. Film offers more opportunity to drift from location to location, following characters as they go, capturing every element of what takes place. The stage requires more subtlety. More story within singular locations. The stage version of Steel Magnolias takes place through several scenes within Truvy’s salon, over the course of nearly two years. There we meet Truvy, Clairee, Annelle, Shelby, M’Lynn, and Ouiser, as we follow the story of Shelby, from her wedding day to her funeral.

In the hands of Face to Face Films showrunner Anthony M. Laura, as a part of their Theater, Interrupted series of virtual productions, Steel Magnolias remains as vibrant and poignant as ever. Cast wonderfully, it’s a testament to the original material, and an ode to the power and strength of women who can cry, laugh, and stand tall against any obstacle.

As Truvy, Vivien Cardone conjures memories of Dolly, quick with her wit, charming to no end, and as captivating as ever. Chelsea Renae captures the “do as I will” nature of Clairee, flippant and owning every line. Rheanna Salazar beautifully takes on the innocence of Annelle, easily lifting the demure character in line with the powerhouse women she comes to know. As Shelby’s mother M’Lynn, Kristen Hasty brings equal doses of protective mother and loving caregiver, offsetting her daughter’s care-free nature. To which, it must be noted that Matigan Nagle’s graceful performance as Shelby cannot be understated. Michelle Miner’s take on Ouiser, a spitfire honest enough to admit she just been “angry for forty years”, is pure venom, harsh and brutal with the hidden heart revealed only in the story’s most tender moment.

The cast carried the production, bringing familiar characters to life as if they’d played them for years. And once again, Laura directs them with precision, leaving no doubt that he understands how to bring the most out of his team. If you are a fan of the film, or if you’ve seen the play, this production of Steel Magnolias is one you simply must watch. Stop what you’re doing, settle in with some sweet tea and chocolate, and laugh yourself to tears, so you can then cry yourself into laughter.

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