Review: Rabbit Hole, a Theatre, Interrupted Production

Theater, Interrupted, the ongoing web-series of theater performances by Face to Face Films, has offered its followers an non-stop stream of quality plays since the beginning of the pandemic. Though we await, with great anticipation, the opportunity to sit quietly in a darkened theater, drawn into the emotional journeys of characters, wowed by performances of ACTUAL ACTORS ON A STAGE, this series continues to fill the gap admirably.

With Rabbit Hole, director and Face to Face Films frontrunner, Anthony M. Laura tackles the grief of a family dealing with the loss of their 4-year-old son. Written by David Lindsay-Abaire (debuting on stage in 2006), the journey delves deep into the myriad ways in which we process grief and loss, and the damage we absorb along the way.

Starring Kristin Seavey and Gabe Calleja as Becca and Howie, mother and father to their late son Danny, we’re propelled into a world of anger and anguish. The duo not only carry the weight of the pain their characters feel, they connect us to their lives and to their struggle with ease and precision, leaving the viewer feeling less a body on the other side of a screen than a visitor in their home longing to help them make it right.

As Jason, the young high school student responsible for Danny’s death, Alex Commito brings warmth and innocence, opening our lens to grief through the eyes of a young man processing his sense of responsibility through stories and a need for closure. Through only a handful of scenes, Commito wastes nothing, his delivery and expression showcasing Jason’s struggle.

Nicole Townsend, as Becca’s sister Izzy, and Gabrielle Arles, as Becca and Izzy’s mother Nat, round out the cast with solid performances, bringing a sense of fullness to the family dynamic. Townsend, in particular, plays off Seavey in their shared scenes as only sisters can, stealing a good bit of the virtual spotlight along the way.

One hopes that the end is near. That the stage will again open soon. That we will be able to return and congregate to watch these fabulous performances. But for now, Theater, Interrupted continues to offer quality performances that quickly make one forget they are cozy at home watching on screen (for free at that!). Anthony M. Laura and the team at Face to Face Films should be commended, remembered, and supported wholly for all they do.

Review: The Nina Variations, a Theater, Interrupted Production

Theater, Interrupted, the series of virtual theater performances created by Face to Face Films director and writer Anthony M. Laura, has offered a consistent run of quality theater over the past year, despite the pandemic. The frustration over our inability to sit and see these takes on stage has waned as the production and performances have gained in momentum.

Their latest, The Nina Variations, written by Steven Dietz is no less impressive.

Company singer Madison C. Gray, opens with a cappella versions of On My Own, from Les Miserables and her haunting rendition of When September Ends by Green Day. She is a great talent and leading these performances with her soothing tones sets the mood for the story that follows.

Taken from the final scene in Anton Chekov’s The Seagull, The Nina Variations is a complex, yet straightforward, take on the difficulties of human emotion, born within the love and devotion to an idea never to be realized. Over 42 scenes, the audience is offered alternate endings to Chekov’s classic work. Though separate and disconnected, they give a full view of the relationship between the writer, Treplev, and Nina, the actress he loves.

Kristen Seavey plays the role of Nina, a young woman blessed with a depth of innocence, humor, and unwavering affection for Treplev’s rival, Trigorin. She captures the full spectrum of Nina’s playfulness and heart with precision, leaving little doubt to the full range of her acting ability.

Matching her scene for scene, Prentice Myles carries the weight of Treplev’s distress and melancholy as if it were his own. He captures the raw excitement of an artist driven by the presence of Nina, while adeptly dipping into the unrelenting chasm of despair in the man’s desperation for Nina’s love.

The performances of Seavey and Myles make The Nina Variations a must watch, despite the overall complexities of the play’s concept. Familiarity with The Seagull does make the viewing an engaging take on the culmination of a classic but is hardly necessary.