Sneak Peek at Sensing Astrid

A successful run of virtual performances hasn’t slowed down Face to Face Films frontrunner, Anthony M. Laura. In addition to his on-going Theater, Interrupted series of plays, Laura has dipped into the creative pool for his upcoming original series, Sensing Astrid. Following the life of a young actress struggling to manage multiple personalities, Laura returns to a strength showcased in 2019’s The Girl With the Red Hair. With an eye for the emotional torment of a fractured mind, Laura delves into the struggles of young Astrid with the delicate touch of a master.

Though the series will arrive to audiences later this year, Face to Face Films recently offered a sneak peek into the world of Astrid by way of four short scenes. Covering a year plus of Astrid’s life and introducing a few characters pivotal to her journey, these four scenes open a world of questions and intrigue.

The writing is on point. Articulate and concise. Nothing speaks to this more than the lingering need to know where her story goes from here. As sneak peek’s go, this one was less a teaser than a full on heart-gripping tattoo on the soul.

This short collection is utterly and decisively stolen by Rand Faris, in the lead role of Astrid Regan. From the opening scene, her emotional connection to Astrid is vibrant and potent. As we delve into the multiple personalities plaguing her mind (Taylor, her current role in film, is an active presence from the second scene on), Faris digs in. Deep. Through her performance, thirty minutes of struggle with Astrid feels like a lifetime of torment. By the time we reach the final scene, in the office of Astrid’s therapist, we are gut-punched by the weight of her pain. Describing her recent role as Taylor, she describes a moment in which Taylor took over. “I couldn’t find Astrid. Then suddenly I was back. And it wasn’t great,” she says.

Joined by Megan Schmitt and Nicole Townsend, in the roles of Bailey and Celine, with music by Philip Lauto, Sensing Astrid is a brilliant opening to what should be a difficult, but captivating, series. Waiting for the next installment is the hard part.

Review: RFK, a production by Theater, Interrupted

Face to Face Films took its cue from the global pandemic in 2020, offering fans of the theater an opportunity to see and experience quality productions from the cozy confines of home. While props and music and staging has evolved since the initial production, the talent and direction has remained top notch.

For its latest production, Theater, Interrupted staged the one-man performance of RFK, written by Jack Holmes.

To begin the production, Face to Face company singer Madison C. Gray welcomed the audience with beautiful acapella renditions of Song of Silence and American Pie, setting the stage for the emotional journey of Robert Kennedy with a haunting sweetness.

Staged at the desk of RFK, the fiery politician framed by an American flag and portrait of sailboats, director Anthony M. Laura gives an online audience the presentable look of a staged performance. Accompanied with music by Philip Lauto, the experience of streaming theater is no longer a novelty, but rather a pleasant and welcomed new normal. With RFK, Theater, Interrupted has once more shown that theater can be an experience to behold, no matter where or when it is viewed.

RFK begins in 1964 and covers the span of 4 years, as Robert Kennedy copes with the loss of his brother, struggles with his political future, the enemies he made as Attorney General, his place in the family, and finds a voice during a time of civil unrest and war.

Dan Kelly portrays Robert Kennedy with an engaging mix of passion and uncertainty, channeling the insecurities and frustrations of a charismatic politician who could never live up to the towering shadow cast by his brother, John F. Kennedy. Kelly brings charm and flair, capturing the heart and charisma—and Boston accent—embodied by RFK.

From the opening scene nine months after his brother’s assassination, to his appearance in the 1968 primaries that brought an end to his life, the journey of RFK is well told, conceived beautifully, and a performance to be remembered.