Review: The Nina Variations, a Theater, Interrupted Production

Theater, Interrupted, the series of virtual theater performances created by Face to Face Films director and writer Anthony M. Laura, has offered a consistent run of quality theater over the past year, despite the pandemic. The frustration over our inability to sit and see these takes on stage has waned as the production and performances have gained in momentum.

Their latest, The Nina Variations, written by Steven Dietz is no less impressive.

Company singer Madison C. Gray, opens with a cappella versions of On My Own, from Les Miserables and her haunting rendition of When September Ends by Green Day. She is a great talent and leading these performances with her soothing tones sets the mood for the story that follows.

Taken from the final scene in Anton Chekov’s The Seagull, The Nina Variations is a complex, yet straightforward, take on the difficulties of human emotion, born within the love and devotion to an idea never to be realized. Over 42 scenes, the audience is offered alternate endings to Chekov’s classic work. Though separate and disconnected, they give a full view of the relationship between the writer, Treplev, and Nina, the actress he loves.

Kristen Seavey plays the role of Nina, a young woman blessed with a depth of innocence, humor, and unwavering affection for Treplev’s rival, Trigorin. She captures the full spectrum of Nina’s playfulness and heart with precision, leaving little doubt to the full range of her acting ability.

Matching her scene for scene, Prentice Myles carries the weight of Treplev’s distress and melancholy as if it were his own. He captures the raw excitement of an artist driven by the presence of Nina, while adeptly dipping into the unrelenting chasm of despair in the man’s desperation for Nina’s love.

The performances of Seavey and Myles make The Nina Variations a must watch, despite the overall complexities of the play’s concept. Familiarity with The Seagull does make the viewing an engaging take on the culmination of a classic but is hardly necessary.

Review: RFK, a production by Theater, Interrupted

Face to Face Films took its cue from the global pandemic in 2020, offering fans of the theater an opportunity to see and experience quality productions from the cozy confines of home. While props and music and staging has evolved since the initial production, the talent and direction has remained top notch.

For its latest production, Theater, Interrupted staged the one-man performance of RFK, written by Jack Holmes.

To begin the production, Face to Face company singer Madison C. Gray welcomed the audience with beautiful acapella renditions of Song of Silence and American Pie, setting the stage for the emotional journey of Robert Kennedy with a haunting sweetness.

Staged at the desk of RFK, the fiery politician framed by an American flag and portrait of sailboats, director Anthony M. Laura gives an online audience the presentable look of a staged performance. Accompanied with music by Philip Lauto, the experience of streaming theater is no longer a novelty, but rather a pleasant and welcomed new normal. With RFK, Theater, Interrupted has once more shown that theater can be an experience to behold, no matter where or when it is viewed.

RFK begins in 1964 and covers the span of 4 years, as Robert Kennedy copes with the loss of his brother, struggles with his political future, the enemies he made as Attorney General, his place in the family, and finds a voice during a time of civil unrest and war.

Dan Kelly portrays Robert Kennedy with an engaging mix of passion and uncertainty, channeling the insecurities and frustrations of a charismatic politician who could never live up to the towering shadow cast by his brother, John F. Kennedy. Kelly brings charm and flair, capturing the heart and charisma—and Boston accent—embodied by RFK.

From the opening scene nine months after his brother’s assassination, to his appearance in the 1968 primaries that brought an end to his life, the journey of RFK is well told, conceived beautifully, and a performance to be remembered.

Review: Hillary & Clinton, a Theater Interrupted production

The specter of 2020 wanes as we drift further into 2021, but the pause on live theater remains. For all that we lost in being unable to see productions in full, live on stage, we have gained in the ongoing efforts of companies like Face to Face Films, whose Theater Interrupted series of online performances offer us an opportunity to connect with the art from the cozy confines of home.

To their credit, Theater Interrupted has taken the cue off stage like a seasoned pro. The professionalism and production of these performances has evolved over the Pandemic Life, to the point where viewing them live or at a time of our choosing is the new norm.

With Hillary & Clinton, director Anthony Laura pays tribute to the 2016 play written by Lucas Hnath. While the title alone evokes strong images and feelings related to the real-life individuals, the concept allows for more flexibility. Told as a tale from an alternate reality—we may well be on one of the infinite parallel earths proposed in the play’s opening scene—and cast with actors who in no way mirror the personalities of Hillary or Bill or Barack, it was the writer’s hope that we may sit and enjoy a story unrelated to the people we know.

And to that end, there is a measure of success. Without the added weight of character impression, we are meant to see Hillary and Bill removed from our personal biases. Stripped down to its core, this is a story of a broken marriage and its future, of the battle with and against emotion, and the disappointment of one woman’s fading dream to be President.

Kristen Hasty and Gabe Calleja carry the load as Hillary and Bill. Both deliver emotionally powerful performances, weaving through the myriad issues that plague their marriage, cutting straight to the heart of what each believes the other carries in blame. Whether they will survive or finally separate, and what that means to each, is a thread throughout. Both actors truly capture the pain and disappointment of a husband and wife reconciling decades of issues.

Jose Duran and Tom Arrowsmith, in the roles of Barack Obama and Mark (Hillary’s campaign manager) respectively, excelled in playing off the often hostile dynamic of Hillary and Bill.

The production of Hillary & Clinton was well handled. With the backdrop of a hotel room on screen, the audience is given a visual cue that offers a sense of place sorely missed from the in-person experience. With subtle cues and narration, actors were drawn off screen smoothly and without intrusion to the continued action.

All in all, Theater Interrupted has seized the opportunity to bring stage-quality performances to audiences at a time when many companies have entirely suspended activity. Hillary & Clinton is another win in the column of Face to Face Films.

Review of Doubt, an online reading

2020 continues to do its thing, offering one alarming raise to the pot of a nerve-wracking poker game we didn’t plan on playing. A fallout—one of many, to be sure—has been the continued shutdown of the entertainment industry. Film and theater have been forced out of production, screens and stages remain dark, and a world in need of entertainment hunts for ways to stave off the stir-crazy building within.

That said, there have been efforts to create alternate routes to entertainment. One of them comes from Face to Face Films. On the heels of their May reading of Little Women, which included a stellar performance from a cast of skilled actors, the online reading series returned in June to take on Doubt, by John Patrick Shanley.

Centered on three main characters—Sister Aloysius Beauvier, played by Vivien Cardone, Father Flynn, played by Alex Commito, and Sister James, played by Rhenna Salazar—Doubt unravels a potential scandal at St. Nicholas, a Roman Catholic elementary school. The course of the drama leaves one riddled with doubt, uncertain as to what is truth and what is deception.

From the production side, Face to Face Films once again stood up to the challenge of presenting a play online, complete with costumes, as well as a complimentary composition from Philip Lauto. Producers Casey Hartnett and Anthony Laura impressed with the quality of the presentation, and with the seamless transition from scene-to-scene with the assistance of narrator Sophie Licata.

All three performances of the main characters were stellar, though it was impossible not to focus on the emotional and captivating take of Sister Aloysius by Vivien Cardone. Played with a sense of urgency that drove the story forward, Cardone stole the show, drawing both ire and compassion from the viewer as the story further detailed the suspicious behavior of Father Flynn toward the school’s only black student, Donald Muller. Alex Commito and Rhenna Salazar balanced the back and forth battle between Aloysius and Flynn with great poise. Salazar captured the innocent idealism of Sister James so effectively it forced the viewer to take the dance of doubt along with her, questioning both Aloysius’ claims and Flynn’s denials.

Not to be ignored, Isha Sumner’s performance as Donald Muller’s mother, Mrs. Muller, was profound and emotional. Despite the limited screen time, Sumner added a sense of gravity to the story that could not be shaken.

At the conclusion of the performance, the cast and crew remained available to answer viewer questions, while the tandem team of Hartnett and Laura announced that the next reading will take place August 1st, with a reading from the screenplay of The Hours by David Hare.

Production in a Pandemic: Vivien Cardone and Anthony Laura

In 2019, I was given the opportunity to conduct a series of interviews on The Girl With the Red Hair, a play by writer/director Anthony Laura. Starring Casey Hartnett as Hayley Jones and featuring Vivien Cardone as Doctor Watkins, The Girl with the Red Hair, is an exploration of the damage rendered by sexual abuse, of a mind in turmoil as it attempts to cope with experiences far too extreme to process. In the ever-deepening shadows of the girl she once was, who is Hayley Jones, and will it be enough to simply be a survivor?

As the cast and crew prepped The Girl With the Red Hair for a limited run in December (a run that received great praise and fanfare), I had the pleasure of discussing the process and direction of the play with Anthony and Casey, as well as supporting actors, Viven Cardone, Samatha Yestrebsky, and Alexandra Rooney. This not only offered the opportunity to discuss each actor’s approach and vision for their character, but also offered the rare opportunity to follow a work as it progressed from script to the stage.

But, then 2020 happened and the world ground to a halt. Which left me wondering: What happens to a stage production when there’s no stage available?

One answer, which is not addressed in the interview that follows, is taking the stage online. After a successful online reading of Little Women, Face to Face Films is currently working on Doubt, by John Patrick Shanley, featuring Vivien Cardone, Alex Commito, Rheanna Salazar, and Isha Sumner. The performance is slated for Saturday, June 27th at 2pm via Zoom.

Production in a Pandemic: Vivien Cardone and Anthony Laura

_____________________________________________________________

Getting the primary question out of the way: How is the current pandemic shutdown affecting your work on The Girl with the Red Hair?

VIVIEN: I guess the most obvious change would have to be the transition to virtual workshops and rehearsals, which does come with its challenges. But I think we have all navigated the new dynamics fairly well. We have still made wonderful progress with peeling back the layers of the story and the characters. Personally, I have noticed that the social distancing has taken a bit of a toll on my emotional and mental health, as I am sure it has for many of us. I have been struggling a bit with trying not to bring that into our company. But there is overwhelming support and understanding from the group, especially from our director Anthony, that has been a great source of comfort to me through all of the isolation.

ANTHONY: We have been lucky enough to be able to continue workshopping through Zoom during the pandemic.  Though we are still unclear where the future will take us in terms of theater openings, I feel we have been maintaining a good flow of work to be ready once we can start in person rehearsals and begin pinning down more specifics for the 2020 run.  All of the actors have been wonderful in embracing this odd virtual process and I think we’ve all become more creative for it.

It would seem that your work together has created a bit of a bond. How has your friendship influenced continued work on the play? 

VIVIEN: Anthony and I hit it off almost immediately, and he has quickly become my closest friend. We have the same sense of humor, we share a passion for our craft, and we have similar artistic visions. We really think on the same wavelength when it comes to our work, so Anthony really doesn’t have to give me much direction for me to understand what he is envisioning for the scene or the character. And I think because we have become so close, and we are so similar in our thinking, we have made tons of progress with Dr. Watkins. Because there is a deep level trust between us, I feel at ease with stepping out of my comfort zone and tackling on the emotionally taxing scenes and character developments that he throws at me. It’s very rare that you encounter such an easy working dynamic, so I feel very blessed to have developed such a close, trusting friendship with him. And it’s great when you are able to separate your working relationship from your personal relationship like we do. We can be poking fun at each other and acting like total idiots one minute, and then the next moment switch into ultra-serious, professional Director/Actor mode. And really, who doesn’t feel ecstatic to get to work closely with their best friend? 

ANTHONY: I agree with Vivien.  We hit it off almost immediately upon meeting and we have continued to become closer as we worked and have gotten to know each other.  She’s someone I trust and who I am always confident understands the direction I’m heading, in terms of Doctor Watkins and other characters.  It’s a blessing to know someone of Vivien’s experience level and to hear her feedback, as we do have similar storytelling goals and I’ve gained so much knowledge just from talking various aspects of projects out with her.  Needless to say, I also have a ton of fun with her.  We laugh and understand each other in a way that is rare, I think.  I second the ecstatic feeling about being able to work with your best friend.  It’s a complete joy and privilege.

And beyond the play, you’ve developed a working relationship within Face to Face Films. In what way has that played out?

VIVIEN: Being part of the company has been such a blessing. Because I am currently in college, I have had to take a bit of a step back from the acting world, which has not been easy for me. But Anthony has been so wonderful with making sure I am welcomed and involved in the company as much as I possibly can be. When I initially started with the company, I was cast as Natalie in “The Rabbits,” and now I am getting to experience the world of theater for the first time. And it has been an incredible journey. Face to Face has become my escape from the stress of school and the pandemic. I have enjoyed every second of being a part of this company. And I am ready to take on any new role Anthony is willing to offer me. Anthony has recently spoken to me about getting more involved in company decisions being made behind the camera and stage, and I have eagerly accepted. So, I am very excited to see how this new working relationship develops.

Circling back to The Girl With the Red Hair, you’re in the process of workshopping for another run later this year. How has the character of Doctor Watkins changed over the entire process?

VIVIEN: I think the biggest changes that have happened with Watkins is in her humanity and her vulnerability. We have been really working to explore who Watkins is outside of her profession, and how that affects her approach with her patients, especially Hayley. We wanted to see how much Watkins’ personal life compared to or paralleled the experiences of her patients. And we wanted to see how much of her past has influenced the doctor she has become. So, it’s been a lot of developing backstories and exploring the different personalities and moods that Watkins might experience from day to day. It’s been a challenge, but in the most rewarding way.

ANTHONY: There’s been a good amount of change with Doctor Watkins.  I think Vivien and I were very interested in exploring aspects of her softer side and how that would conflict with the way she is professionally.  Watkins is a very different character than she originally written, with a large thanks to Vivien.  She opened her up with an empathy and compassion that forces us to examine her rough exterior on the outside.  My hopes are that the audiences can see Watkins’ suffering and get a peek at what she might be hiding beneath her shell.

Life events can often influence art, sometimes even in subtle ways. Has the current pandemic, and outpouring of support for our health care workers, influenced the approach to Doctor Watkins and her place at the center of chaos?

VIVIEN: I would say that the current pandemic has had a greater effect on me emotionally and mentally than I anticipated it would. And that has made me rethink how Watkins might feel or react in stressful situations. It has made me question how much of Watkins’ professional demeanor is a façade and how much of it is sincere. People have a tendency to wear masks as a way of covering up what is really going on beneath the surface. And I think I have come to realize that Watkins is an expert at doing just that. So, Anthony and I have been experimenting with what it might be like for Watkins to peel away that mask a bit, so we can see more of what’s really going on in her mind, and the results have been truly eye-opening.

ANTHONY: That’s a really great question.  One of my hopes once the play sees its next performance is the compassion we have for anyone who treats us.  As we have seen, we often take people on the front lines for granted until we so desperately need them, and Doctor Watkins is no exception to that.  She is someone who cares about the people she treats and works with, even if it’s hard for her to show.

Vivien, you’ve portrayed characters on both the stage and screen. Between the two, what is the biggest difference in your approach?

VIVIEN: I don’t think the difference is as much my own approach as it is the contrast in production styles. Stage and film are two very different animals. In my personal experience with film, a majority of my prep work was done at my own discretion. When you are working on a film set, you are shooting scenes completely out of order. So, you have to take it one scene at a time, emotionally preparing yourself for that particular moment of time in the story. The director will guide you on the right track, but for the most part the prep work is all on the actor to do what they need to, to get where they need to be emotionally for that scene.  With stage productions, you are telling the story from start to finish with no break in between (except for a short intermission). So, all of the prep work you do is to make sure your storytelling is seamless, and that means everyone on and off stage is present and actively involved in every step of the process.

I’ve spent this year asking this question to writers and performers alike, and I’d love your thoughts on it: What do you value more, the mechanics of writing or storytelling?

VIVIEN: I think mechanics are an important component to any art form. But art is nothing without a message to drive it. Anyone can plug and play with textual formulas to create a written work. But I think true storytelling comes from the artistic vision of the writer, and purpose they have for writing. And that message is what people walk away remembering. 

ANTHONY: For me personally, I approach what the story means to me and what my vision and hope is in reaching an audience with it.  I don’t need to have experienced what I’m writing myself, but I need to deeply feel for each character why I’m presenting them to the world and why they are different than other characters or people we’ve seen.  I tend to find the more I think about dialogue, the more wooden it becomes, so most of the dialogue I write comes for a first or second pass and then I run it with the actors to see if it feels natural to them.  So, I suppose, it’s storytelling for me, because I think the perfect omission of information and how it’s structured can stay with an audience more than exactly how it’s written.

Review of Little Women, an online reading

This year has introduced the world to challenges new and difficult to face. The Covid-19 pandemic effectively shut down our daily lives, reducing them to around the clock adventures within the confines of our homes. And though some elements of life are attempting a return to normal, there’s still a gap we used to fill with measures of entertainment to both pass time and to leave lasting impressions on our creative souls.

The Arts have taken a notable hit, from the film industry to publishing to theater. It is the latter that drove me to one effort to bring an element of entertainment to those at home. On Saturday, May 23rd, Face to Face Films launched the first in an ongoing reading series, offering a full company production of Greta Gerwig’s Little Women. Partners Casey Hartnett and Anthony Laura of Face to Face Films designed and produced a full reading of the script, utilizing Zoom as a platform. Much like a table reading—if said table were cut into 12 pieces and placed in 12 different homes—the cast took on the roles and weaved through the story as if prepping for an upcoming stage run.

As an audience member, the experience was unique, yet not entirely unlike attending a full production. Tickets were not a requirement, but registration was, and took little to no time at all to complete. A well-worn theater seat facing a stage was replaced by a cozy and familiar chair at my desk. Several minutes prior to the reading, an email arrived, carrying with it not only a link to lead me to the show, but a program as well. My lights may not have dimmed, but as the music faded and Anthony appeared, I felt the same sense of excitement I would have felt watching a curtain rise. Then the reading began, with the aid of Stage Manager and Narrator Sofia Licata.

There were a few technical glitches along the way, though nothing that disrupted the reading, or went beyond tolerable. The experience of watching actors emote and pantomime eating or dancing on the screen without costume or set felt a little invasive and awkward at first, but quickly became an endearing and enjoyable addition. The cast found a nice groove almost immediately, bringing the story to the forefront, slipping from scene-to-scene seamlessly. As a viewer, I was drawn in. Despite the script’s continued time shifts, following the action was easy and enjoyable, a true testament to the production team as well to the skill of the actors.

In particular, the work of Samantha Yestrebsky as the aloof but determined Amy March was delightful to watch. She fully captured the raw emotion and strength of the character as if it were an extension of herself. Rheanna Salazar and Alexandra Rooney brought a consistent energy and timeless feel to Beth March and Young Beth March, respectively, while Alex Commito, taking on the role of Theodore “Laurie” Laurence, paired with the acting team of the March sisters with effortless precision.

The entire cast came prepared, gave life to their characters, shifted from role to role clearly, and captured the emotional depth of the story well. I would be remiss not to fully appreciate the work done by Josh Adwar, Gabe Calleja, Vivien Cardone, Emma Davidov, Casey Hartnett, and Kristen Hasty (Anthony Laura popped in as multiple characters as well!). Additionally, their willingness to stick around after the performance for a round of Q&A with attendees was highly appreciated and a great addition.

All-in-all, it was an experience worthy of theater and a wonderful use of technology at a time when we’re all a bit entertainment-starved. I applaud the production work of Face to Face Films (as well to their work to raise money for Covid-19 relief) and look forward to June’s presentation of Doubt by John Patrick Shanley, featuring Vivien Cardone, Alex Commito, Rheanna Salazar, and Isha Sumner. We may not be able to journey to the theater for some time, but it’s comforting to know that the theater has found a way to come to us.

A New Reading Series from Face to Face Films

Things are a bit wonky right now. The opportunities for entertainment that we once chose so easily are not an option, and so we’re left hunting for ways to fill our time. Movies are on hold, sports are shelved, book events, festivals, and more have been cancelled or postponed. The primary path to entertainment at the moment often involves a chair, a sofa, or whatever the telelvision can offer. Fortunately, we’re living in a time in which technology offers greater reach and ingenuity is giving rise to new ways of reaching those at home. Which has been a great blessing to those of us in need of entertainment and the inspiring touch of creative folks.

Over nearly a year now, I’ve had the pleasure of following the progress of The Girl With the Red Hair, a play by Anthony Laura of Face to Face Films and starring Casey Hartnett. Through an ongoing series of interviews the cast and crew has offered a behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to bring a play to the stage.

Recently, Face to Face Films announced a new initiative, one that immediately caught my attention. A new reading series, utilizing a collection of talented actors and actresses, that would touch on works relevant to the theme and focus of The Girl With the Red Hair, as well as the strength of women. On Saturday, May 23rd, at 2 p.m. via Zoom, Face to Face presents a reading of Little Women. You won’t want to miss it.

In a time when we’re hungry for entertainment, this inventive and creative use of technology seemed the perfect fit for our time. And a perfect fit for all of us.

So, me being me, I had questions. I wanted to dig in deeper and highlight this effort. Not only to shine a light on something of value, but because this is a rare opportunity to see such talented professionals read work we know so well.

With that, I present a brief interview with Anthony Laura and Casey Hartnett. You’ll want to read this. Then you’ll want to tune in Saturday May 23rd to see something unique and wonderful.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Face to Face films has launched a new reading series, which includes the May 23rd reading of Little Women. What inspired you and the company to create it?

CASEY: Since all theatre and film productions had been shut down, we wanted to find a way to keep theatre alive while in quarantine. We were already virtually workshopping our play, The Girl with the Red Hair so we figured, why not do a series of readings related to the subject matter of the play and themes showcased in the projects being created by the company. Little Women was a great place to start with a public reading because it showcases the stories of these women in such an honest and empowering way and the story is still relatable even today. The reading series has also been a great way to showcase the actors in the company by highlighting their talent in different roles each month. While all of our productions have been put on hold for the time being, the reading series has been a creative life saver.

ANTHONY: We were in talks before the pandemic to start a reading series with our ensemble.  I have been wanting to explore classic and contemporary works that audiences may not be too familiar with.  I also loved the idea of not always casting age appropriate actors in certain roles to further explore the dynamics and chemistry within our company.  There are so many fantastic films and plays out there that have not been on people’s radar and I don’t think there’s anything more exciting than discovering works that are new to you and forming a connection to the people telling you those stories.  I’m very excited for audiences to see our ensemble tackle so many varied roles as we move forward.

Given the current issues with Covid-19, you’ve planned to hold the reading of Little Women via Zoom. Working in this capacity can certainly offer its share of challenges. How are you dealing with those?

CASEY: We have certainly experienced some technical challenges, but none so drastic that would prevent the reading series from working successfully in a virtual space. We have had to figure out the best way to work with sound and dialogue cues, such as not talking over each other as you would be able to do in a live in-person stage production or playing with certain vocal volumes. Instead of having characters talk over each other in the case of having layered text in the script, we have found that having one character speak before the other, with the second actor coming in quickly after the first actor, has helped clean up the dialogue for viewers of the virtual read. Sound just doesn’t carry the same way through a computer screen as it does in person. Another challenge was cutting down the script in a way that would translate better for a virtual reading series. We can’t be on our feet and moving around and working off of the other actors physically, so certain stage directions can help or hinder the viewer’s understanding of the story.

ANTHONY: I’m so proud of how everyone has risen to the challenges that Casey has spoke about.  Dealing with WIFI issues and having to rework the script so it makes sense to a virtual audience as opposed to being put in a visual medium has presented creative hurdles, but it never stopped the progress.  Intact, there has been such camaraderie and laughter as the challenges presented themselves, that it only served to bring us closer and enjoy the process even more!

For Little Women, you’re using a mix of current and former cast members of The Girl With the Red Hair. Was that the intent from the beginning, or did it just work out that way?

CASEY: When casting the readings, we want to cast them with the right actors for the roles. However, with the next run of The Girl With the Red Hair in the works, we wanted to highlight the cast and company members for audiences to see those actors in certain kinds of roles that would bring some excitement and anticipation for audiences to then see those actors perform in the play when it goes up (hopefully this fall!). We happened to cast a few actors from the first run of the play who were perfect for Little Women, and that has been a really fun experience to have everyone back together again, mixed with some new actors as well!

ANTHONY: No, there was never a specific intent.  Many of the actors in TGWTRH are Resident Artists, so I usually try to think of works that will best show off our RA’s, both in the show and not, and then cast the piece around that.  However, as Casey said, we are also looking to showcase the actors from the show through the exploration of similar themes to TGWTRH, in hopes of increasing interest for when the show returns.

Beginning a new program of any type requires a lot of trial-and-error before it settles in. What have you learned through this process, and where do you see this series going long term?

CASEY: I think the main thing we’ve learned is that a virtual reading series could be a really great way to keep theatre alive in a safe and healthy way while also including actors and audiences from all across the country, not just those located in NYC. We have some actors in Lilttle Women located in LA, and we’re excited that we can have friends and family members join the Zoom session from anywhere. Something we’ve learned through the virtual readings is that certain scripts translate better for in-person reads than they do virtually, since the actors can’t work in a physical capacity with the material. That’s just something we keep in mind when deciding which scripts to read over Zoom and which to save for the live reads. So eventually, in the long term goal for the reading series, we plan to put reads up in theatre spaces with live audiences and continue to showcase our resident artists in roles and stories we are excited and inspired by.

ANTHONY: One of the positives I’ve learned is that the interest for storytelling knows no bounds.  People are hungry to tell stories and listen to them, no matter the current constraints.  We’ve been so fortunate to have interest in the series during this time and it has inspired us to work hard and share our love of these stories with people even while they are inside their homes.

What other works are you considering for future readings?

CASEY:So far we’re looking at Doubt, The Hours, Jane Eyre, Steel Magnolias, The Glass Menagerie, Girl, Interrupted, Mean Girls and so many others! We have a long list.   

ANTHONY: Next month, we will be performing Doubt with Vivien Cardone, Alex Commito and Rheanna Salazar.  We are still casting one final role for that.  In addition to the titles Casey spoke about, which I’m so excited about, other titles we are also looking at are The Wolves, 4.48 Psychosis, The Flick, Dance Nation and The Goat.

Both The Girl With the Red Hair and Little Women focus on the strength and resilience of women. Is this a facet of the company’s mission?

CASEY: Absolutely. Our mission is to tell honest, complex stories about women so those are the stories we will be showcasing in the reading stories as well as the stories that we will be writing and creating within the company’s original film and theatre productions.

ANTHONY: 100%.  We are dedicated to telling stories with women at the forefront of these narratives, as well as continuing to explore a multitude of themes that we feel strongly about.  However, that being said, it is also important to us as a company that the women we represent in our characters (both in our original work and our reading series) are seen as people, and not women.  We are striving to have our audiences not assign gender to the stories they watch, but instead become invigorated by each character as a person.

For those interested in watching the reading, how does one register?

CASEY: You can email facetofacereadings@gmail.com to RSVP and then on the day of the read you will receive a Zoom link and voila, you’re in! Technology can be cool sometimes.

Back with Anthony and Casey: Workshopping and New Roles

In 2019, I was given the opportunity to conduct a series of interviews on The Girl With the Red Hair, a play by writer/director Anthony Laura. Starring Casey Hartnett as Hayley Jones, The Girl with the Red Hair, is an exploration of the damage rendered by sexual abuse, of a mind in turmoil as it attempts to cope with experiences far too extreme to process. In the ever-deepening shadows of the girl she once was, who is Hayley Jones, and will it be enough to simply be a survivor?

As the cast and crew prepped The Girl With the Red Hair for a limited run in December (a run that received great praise and fanfare), I had the pleasure of discussing the process and direction of the play with Anthony and Casey, as well as supporting actors, Viven Cardone, Samatha Yestrebsky, and Alexandra Rooney. This not only offered the opportunity to discuss each actor’s approach and vision for their character, but also offered the rare opportunity to follow a work as it progressed from script to the stage.

But, now I have more questions! What happens to a play once a limited run is complete? Where does it go from there? What happens when a play is workshopped?

Fortunately, Anthony has been gracious enough to allow me to continue to follow the cast and crew as they prepare the play for future runs. Through interviews, video chats, pictures, and more, we’ll have a seat at the table as cast and crew develop, prepare, and rewrite The Girl With the Red Hair for future runs on stage.

So … Let’s begin where we started, with Anthony and Casey. 


 

Back with Anthony and Casey:

Workshopping and New Roles

First and foremost, congratulations on a successful run of The Girl with the Red Hair! The reviews certainly spoke highly of the story, and most definitely of your performance, Casey. On the heels of that limited run, where is production now?

Anthony: We’ve been diving into the scenes that we felt worked well over the past two runs and I have been writing new scenes for us to explore, both in terms of some that will appear in the play and some that will only be used for backstory purposes. It’s been interesting to explore the dynamics that don’t exist on the stage, such as how each person relates differently to Doctor Watkins and how their relationships to characters outside of Hayley inform the environment of the hospital.

Casey: Thanks so much! I’m really proud of the work we did last year. Now, we are working towards returning with a larger off-Broadway run this fall. So, beginning with a workshop of the current script, story, and characters, we’re playing around with what we want to keep and what we might want to change in order to adapt the script to tell the story in an even more effective way. So we’re workshopping the play for the first half of the year and then are planning on putting it up in the fall, depending on what happens with the theaters and scheduling regarding the covid-19 virus. Right now we’re keeping a positive outlook and an open mind and focusing on the workshop first and foremost. 

Recently, Face to Face films added the role of Creative Partner for you, Casey. What does that role entail? 

I will be working with Anthony on various productions not only as an actor but also doing various production tasks, sometimes helping with producing or giving feedback on scripts and stories and characters. We just want to be creating and telling stories that we care about … Anthony and I have found that individually as artists we each focus on similar types of stories. About women and taboo issues. So it’s great having a creative partner that you trust who you can just spitball ideas with and create projects that you both genuinely care about. It just so happens that the projects I had been creating independently correlate well with the themes and message that Anthony and Face to Face Films has been trying to get across, so why not work together? 

Anthony, since Casey mentioned the company message, what can you tell us about its focus?

Face To Face Films is focused on female led work and bringing voice to stories about people that are not regularly understood. We have an incredible group of talented Resident Artists in the company, as well as a brilliant behind the scenes team, which also includes Casey, who produce, curate and help promote the shows and films we do. It was always important to me to tell stories that were about people who inspired me and who I wanted to see represented on screen. In addition, I also wanted to create a company with people who I’m inspired by and who believed in each other, just as much as the work we were doing. I believe that the works that audiences respond to are the ones in which the people creating them are as beautiful, kind and as vulnerable as the characters you respond to on the screen or stage. It’s been a privilege to find that in everyone that is working within the company.

Casey, how has your new role changed the way you work with Anthony? What’s been the greatest challenge?

Well, I’ve always felt seen and heard whenever I’ve had an idea about something while working as an actor with Anthony, so now working with him as a creative partner on the production and writing side of things it doesn’t necessarily feel like too much has changed. I guess I’m more comfortable stating my thoughts and opinions about each project that we’re working on knowing that he trusts me as a creative partner in that way. It can be challenging as an actor when you have thoughts and opinions on a project you’re working on because you don’t want to overstep any boundaries with the writer, director or other crew members. There can be an insecurity about that as an actor. So with this new role as a creative partner with Face to Face Films, I feel like I don’t have to apologize or feel guilty about stating my opinions knowing that Anthony actually wants to hear those things from me. Acting can sometimes make you feel like a puppet in a way, so it’s always a gift to work with someone who sees you as a full person and values your opinions and ideas. 

When people work together on artistic projects, it requires an aligned focus and passion. What is it about the two of you that makes for a great partnership?

Anthony: One of the main reasons I asked Casey to become a Creative Partner was because of her passion. When Casey and I first met about a year and a half ago, we immediately connected on the types of stories we wanted to tell and we both felt similarly about the ways we hoped to see women on screen and stage. 

A part of Face To Face that has always been important to me are the relationships of each of us working together. Casey is someone I consider a very close friend outside of work and it’s a privilege to work so closely with someone that you also have that connection with. That’s one thing I love about the company we’ve created, that we are surrounded by close friends in addition to having created a family environment, both in and outside of work.

In terms of acting, Casey is brave, resilient and has an incredible grasp on text. I recently wrote a new monologue for the play that we began workshopping. I had asked Casey to read it blindly, and she nailed every single nuance. I think she understands the way I write and can give every comma, and every word the desired effect I had intended without us having spoken about it. It’s rare to come across an actor who silently can understand and deliver your intentions so beautifully and effortlessly.

I think, for me, what makes us great partners is the way we listen to each other, trust each other, have each other’s backs and the way that, even in the midst of working on something so challenging, we can still find ways to laugh and challenge each other. As similar as our viewpoints are in work, we also differ on many things and that’s a big reason I wanted her as a partner. She consistently challenges me to think deeper about characters I’ve created and thought I knew, and the result is always electrifying.

Casey: We met over a year ago when I auditioned for a film of Anthony’s, and since we started working together it seems like we just felt a connection and a mutual understanding and respect for one another. It’s hard to explain because I can’t pinpoint the exact moment when our collaborative relationship also felt like a friendship, but when you feel like you can trust someone while doing such personal and vulnerable work you want to continue that partnership. We definitely end up on some pretty funny tangents while working together, but it’s knowing that we can do the work efficiently and also laugh and have a good time that makes the work environment so comfortable and effective. I know I’ve made comments or suggestions that I’d be too embarrassed or insecure to mention in other work environments and they actually ended up being suggestions that we’ve gone further with. It’s being able to trust one another that allows us to put forth ideas that might feel far-fetched in our minds but actually bring about so many other wonderful ideas

In reviewing the characters from the December run, what stood out to you both the most? What changes did you feel were necessary?

Anthony: I think we are still figuring out exactly what changes were necessary.  However, what stood out to me was the ways in which the audience was affected emotionally in certain parts of the show. I think there are particular moments, such as Cortney’s monologue in Act 2, Hayley’s monologue discussing her past (in Act 2 as well,) and the surprising revelations that the story has as it moves along, that have always packed a punch in the rehearsal room and we hoped the audience would feel what we felt. Yet, there were other moments that the audiences also became affected by in terms of Coury, Tabitha, and of course, Young Hayley, that allowed me to understand how people were connecting to other characters in addition to Hayley and that immediately became exciting for what I wanted to explore as the workshops progressed.

Casey: We have so much love for these characters so we really just wanted to dive further into who each person is and the relationships they have with one another and particularly with Hayley. We felt an importance in showcasing Dr. Watkin’s vulnerabilities more and how hard it is seeing your patients struggle. There’s also been a lot more to explore with Young Hayley, Pamela, and Cortney and I wanted to see more of Eve and Hayley’s friendship as well. Dixie’s character of the Singer as a hallucination has changed a bit, too, so I’m really excited about that. In shortening the length of the play, we also had to think about which character might be able to be combined with another one. That’s definitely been the hardest part of this process because we love them all so much. 

What takes place when a play is being workshopped? What do you hope to gain from it?

Anthony: Every workshop is different, depending on your desired end result.  Right now, the work being done with Hayley is helping to explore and bring out elements we haven’t seen yet, such as who she was outside of the hospital and what her hopes and dreams are that still reside in her.  We are also exploring scenes that will not exist in the play and are using those as exercises to help deepen certain relationships. Based on the current state of the world, we have moved everything to become virtual, so the workshop is also adapting to that, knowing that we are not able to do anything physically or in terms of blocking. This allows us to take a little more time around the table before we are ready to come back in the same room with each other. I think the gain will be in understanding these characters in ways we didn’t have the opportunity to before and, hopefully discovering new elements to work into the play that wouldn’t have been possible without this work.

Casey: Anthony has been writing scenes for each of us actors individually and we read through them, act them out, and feel out what’s working and what’s not. Anthony and I have also gone through the entire script and decided which scenes we feel could be omitted or are necessary to be kept in. It’s fun seeing new scenes mixed with the old and seeing these characters evolve. All I can hope for is that we’re continuing to tell an honest story that we really love about characters that we care a lot about and are continuing to protect the humanity of these characters as the story of the play evolves.

What was the most unexpected and exciting discovery from the limited run?

Anthony: For me, the most exciting part was the audience. Watching how differently they reacted each night and the different points of the play they connected to. I love watching these actors work every night and seeing how they adapt to different energy and how deeply the story affects them. It brings me to tears watching their dedication to each other and the story. Also, though it wasn’t unexpected because of her talent and LITERAL ADORABLENESS, the audience’s reaction to Alexandra Rooney, who plays Young Hayley, was really moving to me. She became such a central part of the story we were telling that I had hoped the audience understood the journey we were going for with showing the dichotomy of both Hayley’s, so I felt proud in the way that landed and touched people.

Casey: Honestly, what comes to mind was how much the cast and crew had each other’s backs during the December run. Not that I wasn’t expecting it at all, but the depth of it was a nice reassurance. On opening night I suddenly felt nauseous after intermission and when I had a brief second backstage, I let Sofia, our stage manager, know before running back on with a quick, “I might have to puke.” I was mentally preparing for a safe time to run to the toilet but when I went offstage the next time, Sofia had a garbage can and ginger ale at the ready. I didn’t puke, FYI. Another actor felt nauseous during a different performance and we just knew that the other actors would be ready to adlib if one of us ever needed to run offstage quickly. I think that support and bond was a weird little exciting discovery among the group that we have working together. Knowing that that trust is there makes the work we’re doing onstage ten times better because we feel supported and covered in case anything crazy happens during a performance. 

From the onset, through the limited run in December your relationship was strictly director and actor. With Casey’s move to Producer, how has that influenced working together?

Anthony: I think from the onset of when we began collaborating, Casey and I have always worked closely and exchanged ideas. Now, I think there is even more of a freedom to discuss and explore different areas that fall outside of just acting.  Casey is extremely well read and the ideas she puts forward come from a very intellectual place, in addition to an emotional and instinctual place. That’s been pretty exciting to me, getting to explore the ideas that we are both passionate about outside of just the themes we are dealing with in the current work. I think that informs us in how we want to develop what projects and characters excite as we think about creating future work together.

Casey: Being asked to move into a producer role has allowed me to feel more comfortable giving input and sharing my ideas and opinions. As an actor, you don’t want to overstep those boundaries, even though Anthony has always been very open about hearing ideas from his actors. We’ve been on the same page with pretty much everything that’s come up during the workshop so far, which is lucky.

For those of us who have never been through the process, what is it like working through this stage of a play’s life? What does an average day look like?

Anthony: At this stage, it’s a lot of talking and playing with scenes. I’ll write a scene and we will read it together, and start going bit by bit through it to discover intention and why we think it works or doesn’t work in the body of the play. Sometimes, we will revisit scenes that already exist in the play and discuss portions that may no longer fit with the new pages we’re creating. It’s a lot of back and forth as we slowly build parts of characters that the audiences will never see, but hopefully, will always feel.

Casey: The workshop is fun because each session where we’re working together, which now has to be virtually through FaceTime, Anthony has written new material for me to work on. It’s exciting to take these characters through new small adventures within the same world with each new scene we work on. We’re usually reading through new scenes, analysing the scenes and discussing how they would fit into the world of the play and where it might go in the script, which scene it could replace or be added to, and so on. Then, of course, we’ll take time to discuss production details–the producing side of things–such as theaters we’re looking at, our timeline and potential schedule for the fall, and so on

As a writer or actor, every character brings with them lessons that can carry over. You’ve both been immersed in the journey of Haley Jones for some time now. What has she taught you?

Anthony: Kindness and compassion. Hayley has grown into what Casey has developed her into and I always walk away with the lesson of compassion. She’s one of the bravest characters I’ve ever written and I think courage through kindness is what defines Hayley to me.

Casey: I’ve learned so much from Hayley. I think the biggest thing she’s taught me has been that we don’t have to be alone in whatever it is we are going through. Seeing how many audience members felt personal connections to the play, it felt like I was learning this more and more everyday as Hayley was. She’s also taught me more about self-acceptance and self-awareness than anyone I’ve ever known in real life, I think. Hayley does have an awareness of what’s going on with her mental health, even when it feels as if she’s lost control of it all. She’s also proven to me how important it is to accept what you’re going through and not be ashamed of who you are because you can’t move on until you’ve accepted wherever it is you’ve found yourself at the moment and can use that to learn from and grow even stronger as you move forward into the next phase of your life. No matter how scary that might be, it won’t be forever

You mentioned expanding the role of Young Haley. What inspired that choice and what can she add to the overall dynamic of the play?

Anthony: (SPOILER ALERT) The dynamic between Alexandra and Casey is fascinating to watch. The love they have for each other becomes very present on stage. Having dealt further with the sexual abuse that Hayley suffered, bringing Young Hayley to the forefront has allowed us to show the moment in her life before her innocence was taken away and how it effected the trajectory of the rest of her life. There’s a moment, a shift, and I think it happens whether we’ve experienced trauma or not, where we no longer look at the world through childlike eyes. Our responses become more measured, and we become more aware of how other people perceive us. I was really excited to further explore how Hayley has grown or been held back since that moment of trauma occurred.

Casey: Anthony’s addition of Young Hayley has been really effective, I think. It’s so heartbreaking seeing that divide between the carefree, playful nature of Hayley’s youth and the pain and hurt that Hayley is feeling trapped in as an adult. I think most people experience something that can quickly steal the naivete of youth right out from under their noses, and the feeling of that is universal even if we’ve blocked out whatever it was that made that happen for us. I think seeing Young Hayley can help audiences connect Hayley more with her full humanity rather than just viewing her as someone who has completely lost her mind, because she is still the same person as she was when she was young. She still has that beauty in her. She’s just working through some new circumstances.

Casey, given the sensitive nature of Hayley’s story, what kind of reaction did you receive from the audiences? 

Vivien (Cardone) hugged me before the curtain call one night and said, “Every single person in that audience is crying.” Some people were speechless because the play hit so many people pretty hard. Friends and strangers were coming up to me afterwards telling me how they each personally related to the story, whether it was themselves going through something similar or someone they love. A friend of mine said how good it felt to finally feel represented onstage in a story like this. After our final performance, I found myself hugging and crying with a young woman who I had never met before but I suddenly felt so close to. She said she finally felt seen and accepted. It was so powerful and I said to myself, “We can’t stop. We have to keep going.” People I had known for my entire life who saw the show were suddenly sharing very personal things with me that they had never opened up about before. It was very powerful to see how universal this topic really is and how many people it affected in various ways. 

Before we bring this interview to a close, I wondered if you could both speak to your hopes for the company, as well for the work you will create as collaborative partners?

Anthony: I am very excited for what the company has on its slate for the next couple of years. In addition to The Girl With the Red Hair having another couple of runs, we also have several web-series in development.  One of them, Kara, featuring Casey as the title character, deals with the effects of a school shooting survivor and the impact it has had on her mental health and relationships. We are also establishing a reading series with our company members in which we will put on readings of plays and screenplays, both produced and unproduced. Vivien Cardone, one of our Residents who plays Doctor Watkins, and I are also developing ideas for a web series in the  future and Samantha Yestrebsky, another Resident who plays Cortney and Azura, and I have also spoken about branching off the Azura character in other works.

I really enjoy writing for Casey and finding roles that intrigue the both of us and now, to have her on board as a CP, it feels even more invigorating to have her as a bigger part of the process and put out these plays, web-series and films that we both connect to so deeply.

Casey: I hope we can continue to create work that we care deeply about with people who have a similar love for the stories we want to tell and the humanity of the characters we want to convey through these projects. I just think it’s important to be telling the stories you really want to tell and are passionate about because when it comes from a place of love and care, no matter who sees it or where it gets shown, that is always the most rewarding work you will do and the work that makes you feel the most alive.


 

A Time Like No Other

I wrote this as a version of a PR release for Broadleaf Writers. Though it was sent to writers in that growing community, I feel it’s appropriate for (and meant for) everyone.

Hang in there folks. Stay safe. Be smart.

Feel free to share any thoughts, comments, worries, fears, hopes, etc that you may have.

Z

After the attacks on September 11th, 2001, our country fell silent. The skies were empty, roads spotty with cars, work ground to a stop as schools and stores closed. We waited. For what, we weren’t entirely sure, but we knew a moment was required to pause, reflect, regroup, and plan for the future.

Today is different. Today, while stores may open and work will continue–whether from home or a place of business–the waiting comes with an unknown endpoint. We aren’t recovering from a singular moment. We’re watching it unfold in slow motion across the globe. We’re not facing off against a radical segment of humanity, we’re settling in for a war with a pandemic.

Like any war, it requires a great deal of sacrifice, a willingness to do what must be done in order to save as many lives as we can. It requires solidarity, a desire to lift one another up as we fall, to stand together, as one nation, as one species. It requires faith and hope and an unwavering focus on the day when victory is acheived and life begins anew. Reformed, driven by an experience that reshapes our perspective.

There is light at the end of the tunnel. But there’s darkness to walk before we get there.

But we will get there.

As a writing organization, Broadleaf Writers is designed to influence and inspire writers, to educate and offer instruction in a skill that assists in taking that which is brain-bound and giving it a voice on the page. We are meant to function as a community, to help one another learn, grow, and realize our dreams. I will always believe that we–as humans, as a community, as a collective of like-minded individuals, etc–are only as strong as those we stand beside. So, I encourage you to buckle up, do what you must do to benefit us as a whole, and be prepared to jump in feet-first when it’s time to reset our world (no matter global or the world of your home). Be mindful of others, be mindful of those you love, be mindful of yourself.

And if you find yourself with an abundance of time–as it seems we all may–write. Dig in. Pour your soul onto the page. Take all the fear and worry and concern and hope you’re experience right now and write it out.

As to our slate of 2020 programming, we’re monitoring the virus and recommendations for public gatherings. At the moment, we’re holding a place for our April 11th Write Now program, while moving forward with the open of registration on April 1st for the 5th Annual Broadleaf Writers Conference in October. By then, I’m sure we’ll all need a breakout weekend of fun and community.

For now, stay safe. Follow the recommendations of the medical field and stay home unless you absolutely need to get out. You may be able to withstand the nastiness of an exceptionally powerful flu, but you can’t be certain others you will encounter can. Write. Read. Be with your family. Find reason to laugh as much as possible.

The darkness is temporary. There will be light. Walk the tunnel together and we’ll see what the world looks like when we get there. Then we’ll adjust accordingly.

If you want to share any thoughts–on writing or otherwise–or have some material you’d like feedback on, feel free to reach out. You can email me at zach@broadleafwriters.com, or find me on Facebook or Twitter.

Be well. My thoughts are with you all.

Once Upon a Retail Dream

I worked for Barnes & Noble many many moons ago. For the better part, it was a good job. I made a number of friends I still have to this day, learned a great deal about bureaucracy, came to grips with the fact that some people suck, and got to see the world of books from a side that was more terrifying and heart-wrenching than I could have ever imagined.

Working in a bookstore is a blessing.

Working in a bookstore during Christmas is soul-crushing.

One night I was the manager-on-duty during an overnight inventory. This involved a lot of wandering, answering questions when the inventory team (an outsourced company) had them, and an abundance of idle time.

I took some of that time to pay homage to one of my favorite stories of all time: How the Grinch Stole Christmas. I had it memorized at one point, though I doubt I could remember half of it now. To the beat–more or less–of The Grinch, I wrote about the experience of being in retail this time of year.

I was idealistic once, as well. My first Christmas at B&N put that to rest.

Final note: I’m not a poet. Generally, I’m an idiot. No need to edit my work here. Just enjoy, and maybe–just maybe–be a bit more kind to the folks working retail. It. Is. Hard.

Once Upon a Retail Dream

In a town, once there was, not so far from the fuss

of a city that travelled by car and by bus;

crowds of people who would pounce

and then pay no heed,

to the stories and literature they were told to read.

 

And in this small town was a store that sold books,

a place of joy and good will where friends and family alike

would come to browse and to gawk and to look

for stories upon stories to warm their bleak hearts,

for those in need, for those not quite right,

for those so eager to read by fine light.

 

And to this store one day, there came a man,

whose smile brought good cheer to this place in demand.

He came with a box full of ribbons and bows,

full of doo-dads and papers and puppets for shows!

They welcomed him warmly, this boss who promised the most,

and granted their allegiance as he took this fine post.

They cried, “Hooray for this man, who brings with him hope!

He seeks our redemption, he may right our doomed boat!”

 

But the man formed a grin, a strange little smirk.

“What do you mean?” he asked,

“This store is a blessing, not the slightest known quirk.”

The employees, they did laugh,

most simply shaking their heads;

then one spoke up light, her fair voice so sweet,

she bit at her lip and said, “Oh, brother, we’re dead.”

 

“Surely, you jest,” said the man still aglow,

“Let me show you the heart of the customer flow.”

He walked to the door with a bounce in his step,

his face full of joy, his hum full of pep.

He reached for the lock, those in wait staring long,

for a moment he paused, his mind waging within,

they looked so intense, unhappy and withdrawn.

But he drew his best smile—a patented grin—and parted the door,

which they pushed open so quickly,

he was knocked to the floor.

 

“We told you,” the workers said,

as he wiped dust from his pants,

“They’re maniacs, they’re mad,

they’re retail’s life-sucking ants.”

“Just anxious,” he said, with notable doubt,

“They needed their coffee, a few simple gifts,

they needed exercise books to workout.

They’ll get what they need,

then they’ll hurry right out.”

 

But the customers did linger, they plopped into chairs,

they scattered books and they slept,

and they bumped tables without care.

Signs fell to the floor, the children’s section was trashed,

the café was pillaged, and displays were crashed.

The carpet—once as neat as his bed—was littered

with pastries that were mangled, half-eaten and mashed.

“What are you doing?” asked the man, his hands wringing with fear,

“This is a store to buy books! There’s no carnival here!”

But the people paid no mind, they hurried instead,

their faces intent, eyes glossy like pearls,

they rummaged through clearance racks and filled him with dread.

 

“I don’t understand!” he cried, but to no great avail,

“You’re supposed to come shop, not barter for sales!”

And the man who did smile as he walked through the door,

with boasts of good fortune and scores of good cheer,

suddenly realized that retail was a little bit more

than selling to people who know what they want.

“They shop without purpose, they shop without heart.

They shop without discounts or knowledge or carts!”

 

And what did they hear on that cool winter day?

Those customers and employees, well, in whispers they say,

that the man with the smile and promises of more,

screamed and he screamed

as they carried him out from the store.

He screamed like a child, in the white jacket he wore.